Easter Every Day

Easter Every Day

3 Or do you not know that all of us who have been baptized into Christ Jesus have been baptized into His death? 4 Therefore we have been buried with Him through baptism into death, so that as Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, so we too might walk in newness of life. 5 For if we have become united with Him in the likeness of His death, certainly we shall also be in the likeness of His resurrection. Romans 6:3–5 NASB

“Why can’t Christmas be every day?” Every December, kids are excited for Christmas, and some wish it was always Christmas. Adults who stress over gift purchases and holiday preparations, on the other hand, may be relieved that Christmas comes but once a year.

Like Christmas, Easter isn’t truly all about the gifts and candy. These holidays aren’t even all about family. Christmas and Easter function to move us through the Christian calendar as it follows the life of Christ and the Church. The Christmas season provides twelve days to consider God becoming flesh and dwelling among us. The Easter season gives us fifty days to dwell on Christ’s resurrection victory over sin, death, and the devil.

Why can’t Easter be every day? It actually is!

In Romans 6:4, the Apostle Paul explains that our life in Christ is completely interwoven with His resurrection from the dead. Christians are no longer spiritually dead in sin and unbelief, but alive in Christ’s righteousness and faith. We have been raised to life with Him. Every day is Easter for us as we confess our sins, believe in Jesus Christ for our forgiveness, and see the Holy Spirit produce the fruits of repentance in us as godly obedience becomes a joyful pursuit. That’s what putting the flesh to death and walking in newness of life looks like.

When Paul says in verse 4, “We have been buried with Him through Baptism into death,” He inseparably ties our life with Christ to our Baptism. Lutherans believe that the Holy Spirit works through means to do His gracious work in our lives. The primary means of grace is the Gospel Word of God, but that same Gospel comes to us visibly in the sacraments of Baptism and Communion. We believe that God uses Baptism to actually do something. Baptism forgives sin, saves us, and brings us forth to new life, because God’s living and active Word is connected with the water. Many of our non-Lutheran brothers and sisters in Christ emphasize what the sacraments symbolize, while Lutherans believe that the Scriptures emphasize what the Holy Spirit is doing through the sacraments.

And yet, Lutherans still recognize some symbolism in Baptism. Paul is showing in Romans 6 that your Baptism signifies your daily death and resurrection with Christ. Luther’s answer to what Baptism is a symbol of is found in the Small Catechism: “It signifies that the old Adam in us, together with all sins and evil lusts, should be drowned by daily sorrow and repentance and be put to death; and that the new man should daily come forth and rise to live before God in righteousness and holiness forever.”

Every day is Easter for us, because every day through confession and faith we put to death the flesh and rise again with Christ in new life.  Read through Luther’s answer above in bold a couple times and see if you can pass this quiz without peeking at the answer:

“What does such baptizing with water signify?

It signifies that the old Adam in us, together with all ______ and evil lusts, should be __________ by daily __________ and _____________ and be put to death; and that the new man should daily _______  _________ and rise to ________ before God ____ ___________________ and holiness forever.

Today, as you walk in repentance, remember that you are saved by God’s grace, through faith, and not by your works. Return to the waters of your Baptism daily as you put to death the desires of your flesh through confession and rise to life with Christ through faith.

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